From the Library: A Dystopian, a Thriller, and a Memoir

These three genres are not my usual fare, but I dip into them from time to time, and usually enjoy it when I do. Crosshairs by Catherine Hernandez In southern Ontario, the concrete jungle of Toronto was transformed into a shallow bayou. Park benches sat in water like rafts in muck. Beneath the surface of … Continue reading From the Library: A Dystopian, a Thriller, and a Memoir

Highlights of 2020

Atlantic Canada Five years ago I decided to challenge myself to read more books from Atlantic Canada. As a result, I have read 131 books from Atlantic Canada in the last five years. You can check out results of previous years here: 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016. #of Atlantic Canadian books read: 31 (last year, 25) % of books read from Atlantic Canada: 39% (last year, 32%) … Continue reading Highlights of 2020

From the Library: Khatna, Addiction, and Coming-of-Age

All excellent books, all written by women of colour, taking me from New York to India, from Alabama to Ghana, and finally to the suburbs of Toronto. Seven by Farzana Doctor When I learned that Seven was a book, in part, about Khatna--a cultural or religious ritual of female genital cutting--I was worried it would … Continue reading From the Library: Khatna, Addiction, and Coming-of-Age

Novellas in November 2020: Featuring Bog People, Insomnia, and the Disappearance of the Moon

Novellas in November is being co-hosted by Rebecca @BookishBeck and Cathy @746Books this year, and was categorized into weekly themes. As it's the last day of the month, I'm just grouping mine together, but I did notice that each of my novellas is from a different country: the US, the UK, Norway, the Netherlands, and … Continue reading Novellas in November 2020: Featuring Bog People, Insomnia, and the Disappearance of the Moon

#AusReadingMonth: The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood

This book has been on my list since it won the Stella Prize in 2016, and thanks to AusReading Month--hosted by Brona@BronasBooks--I finally read it. The Natural Way of Things was inspired by a documentary the author watched about The Hay Institution for Girls: ten women were taken there and brutalized for being the "ten … Continue reading #AusReadingMonth: The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood

From the Library: Home Children, A Pandemic, A Cult, and Jane Austen

The Forgotten Home Child by Genevieve Graham I had hoped the trunk would outlive me. That once I was gone, someone could dust it off, open the latches, and discover the treasures old Gran had hidden away. Without me to tell the story, no one would be able to figure it out. It would remain … Continue reading From the Library: Home Children, A Pandemic, A Cult, and Jane Austen