Literary Love: In Honour of Valentine’s Day #3

Previous years: Lit Love #1 and Lit Love #2.

This year’s edition of Literary Love:

 

16057370Octogenarian Love:

And the Birds Rained Down by Jocelyne Saucier

Love, there is only love… to explain what we don’t understand.

 

 

 

929547Enduring Love:

Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

I shall do one thing in this life – one thing certain – that is, love you, and long for you, and keep wanting you till I die.

 

 

 

7456754Unintended Love:

Away From Everywhere by Chad Pelley

There is a reason they call it falling in love. It always happens by accident, and it’s always too late once it happens. You’ve already fallen, you’re already stuck. Right or wrong.

 

 

34462Creepy Obsessive Love:

Naomi by Junichiro Tanizaki

… most of her value to me lay in the fact that I’d brought her up myself, that I myself had made her into the woman she was, and that only I knew every part of her body. For me Naomi was the same as a fruit that I’d cultivated myself. I’d labored hard and spared no pains to bring that piece of fruit to its present, magnificent ripeness, and it was only proper that I, the cultivator, should be the one to taste it.

17465453Love of Knowledge:

The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert

All her life, she felt, she had lived in a state of speculation. All she had ever wanted was to know things, yet still and now – even after all these years of tireless questioning – all she did was ponder and wonder and guess.

This life is a mystery, yes, and it is often a trial, but if one can find some facts within in, one should always do so – for knowledge is the most precious of all commodities.

22941579Long-Distance Love:

Every Blade of Grass by Thomas Wharton

Sometimes a person doesn’t really want certain things to change, even if they think they do.

… if you wait until something is a dead certainty, by that time it may just be dead.

 

 

26045638Love Gone Wrong:

The Road To Atlantis by Leo Brent Robillard

It broke David’s heart to see his son this way, his eyes lingering on his father, squeezing everything possible from that moment. It broke his heart, because he knew that one day Matty would discover what David already knew. Everything eventually came to an end. Even love, And if it didn’t end, it twisted and became sharp and ugly, and then you simply wanted it to end.

619-7_COV.inddFairy-Tale Love:

The Douglas Notebooks by Christine Eddie

We often imagine that love must gush forth spontaneously, surround itself with disarming turmoil, and blossom with a roar. Yet love also advances with muffled tread.

 

 

 

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28 thoughts on “Literary Love: In Honour of Valentine’s Day #3

    • Naomi says:

      Me too. One of the reasons I like doing this post is because it always puts a smile on my face to see all the book covers and quotations. It’s a good chance to just have fun with what I’ve read. 🙂

    • Naomi says:

      I loved Far From the Madding Crowd, and wanted to squeeze some more goodness out of it. I thought about using it 3 times in this post, representing the 3 men with their different approaches to ‘loving’ Bathsheba, but in the end just went with my favourite.

  1. Deepika Ramesh says:

    Thank you for this list, Naomi. I read Elizabeth Gilbert’s ‘Big Magic’, and got to know so much about ‘The Signature of All things’. I so look forward to reading that along with ‘The Douglas Notebook’, and ‘Every Blade of Grass’. 🙂

  2. sharkell says:

    What a wonderful post! I loved reading it and it made me want yo go out and track down all of the books that you mention.

  3. Lynn says:

    Ooohhh…the Tanizaki! and it’s title is your name! I’m afraid to ever know the details associated with that creepy quote! I could argue the Pelley quote about it always being “accidental” and “too late.” Hmmmm…some good fodder for discussion here!

  4. Cecilia says:

    I love this post! It would be really interesting to break down books by the kinds of love they depict. Do you have a favorite here? I will check out your previous years’ posts. Happy Valentine’s Day!

    • Naomi says:

      I love doing up these posts just so that I can think up all the different kinds of love that I’ve found in the books I’ve been reading – it’s fun!

      Hmm… a favourite… so hard to choose, since most of these books have been favourites (the only exception being ‘Naomi’, which I liked but didn’t love). Agh – I can only narrow it down to And the Birds Rained Down, The Signature of All Things, Every Blade of Grass, and The Douglas Notebooks. 🙂

  5. Don Royster says:

    Love “Far From the Madding Crowd”. Truly a great read. If you must see the movie, don’t see the recent remake. The Julie Christie as Bathsheba Everdene is much better. Also I just learned that Katnis Everdeen is the heroine in “The Hunger Games”. Coincidence?

    • Naomi says:

      I already did see the remake, and I liked it. But, I have heard before that the Julie Christie version is better, so I will have to watch that sometime, too.
      I have wondered about Katniss’s last name being Everdeen also. I can’t figure out if it’s coincidence or not. I have to admit that I’m not a big fan of Katniss, although I did enjoy the books. What do you think?

      • Don Royster says:

        I didn’t read the books. But the movies aren’t all that great. I am getting to the point of hating when they break up one of these books into two movies. Suzanne Collins started this dystopian fiction for the juvenile audience. It’s getting to the point that most of it is not very original. Give me Harry Potter anyday.

      • Naomi says:

        I have to say that I really didn’t like the actor who played Troy. I was not convinced that anyone would fall for him at all.

  6. BookerTalk says:

    how wonderful this is. and you’ve chosen one of my favourite Hardy books though not my favourite line: Gabriel says to Bathsheba “And at home by the fire, whenever you look up there I shall be— and whenever I look up, there will be you.”

    Another one to add to the list is Great Expectations which ends (in one version at least) with Pip’s comment about Estella who he’d worshipped for so long though she was rather beastly to him: “I saw no shadow of another parting from her'”

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